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I’m back…

So after taking a good while off from this place, I’ve decided to get this going again.

After completing a year in industry, and subsequently managing to get a job out of it, I am current midway through my final year of my design degree.

Work commitments ended up putting this place on hold for a while but I am back and ready to share my experiences with the design world once again.

I have various project underway at the moment, some in which I will share with you soon, and I am very excited about what is developing over the next few months.

I am glad to be back!

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Smart ebike

Like it!

irwindesigned

One of the sweetest electric bikes I’ve seen…BUT…

Yes, the environmental impact, or footprintof an electric bicycle is monumentally smaller than a combustion vehicle. It takes up less space on the road, is more navigable than an automobile, can be transported easier, and of course, uses very little fossil fuel throughout its use.

That said and at the risk of not knowing the actual design drivers for this project, I’m wondering why they chose such a costly environmental unfriendly material – billet aluminum. Procuring solid billet aluminum requires a gratuitous amount of energy and water to produce, which translates into its GHG (green house gas) equivalent (environmental impact) to be VERY high with respects to other structurally comparable materials. According to a study done by PE International & Five Winds released Mar 10, 2010, for every pound of primary aluminum ingot produced (keep in mind this figure does not…

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Happy Birthday Barcodes

60 years and 1 day ago, the patent for barcodes was filed in the US.

And much like the tin opener, they proceded the widespread technology to use them. Brilliant foresight or just naivety?

Whatever the answer to that question, the fact that pretty much every physical product in the world involves barcodes in some form or another means that they got something right.

60 years is a long time for a technology to hold its own and, for the foreseeable future, they don’t look like to be a dying one. I just hope Mr Barcode inventor has earnt his just rewards for an understated but quite brilliant bit of the modern world.

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Google Glasses Reality Check

For anyone who think the forthcoming Google Project Glasses are the coolest things ever, I will point you in the direction of Black Mirror, a Channel 4 programme written by Charlie Brooker. The show, one of a three-part twisted and cynical look at the future of society, was very successful in the UK but I’m not sure on its impact further afield.

This dark and alternative view of the future, that pre dated the announcement by Google, predicts a virtual memory implanted into every human. Sounds like a cool idea but the implications are much more deep rooted…

Certainly worth a look whatever your viewpoint is on Google.

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UK Housing is Not Doomed.

The building industry cannot be described as revolutionary, well not in the UK anyway. The majority of houses currently being built certainly lack character, charm and quality. With 70% of houses being built by the private sector, 70% of houses are built with economics in mind, not to improve the lives of the people who live in them. Innovation from this majority is seen as a marketing front, not genuine attempt to improve the quality of the homes in the UK and this is the most worrying sign of all.

So the Government have decided to step in and stop them getting away with house building murder. The Code for Sustainable Homes (CfSH) demands improvement in quality of new build houses by reducing – and eventually eliminating – the energy demand. It seems the only way to drive social improvement is to hit the commanding forces where it hurts – Their wallets. A sad but true statement.

As of 2016, new houses will have to be carbon neutral in the UK, produced as much energy as they consume. The days of leaky, fuel thirsty homes will be a thing of the past (hopefully) and the opportunities for product innovation within the building industry are huge but challenging, given the time scale. When the CfSH was announced, it was swept under the carpet by everyone in the industry, but it hasn’t gone away. Now the big players are worried and are actively seeks solutions to problems. Both process and product improvements require significant attention and this direction is an industrial designers dream.

Forced innovation may be sad but without it, the future of the UK home was doomed.

We might even see some charcter return to the UK’s housing stock!

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Marxism in Design

The hype about 3D printers doesn’t seem to be running out of steam. The BBC have ran an article on how the technology will spark the next age of revolution; industrial, digital and now creative. Moving design into the hands of the people who use it – Democratic Design.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19347120

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